Top Catholic High Schools in the United States

Many people trust Catholic high schools to give their children the highest level of education mixed with religion. These schools are built to fit your needs and provide education towards the next level of life. We’ve got a list of some of the top Catholic high schools.

 

Cistercian Preparatory School; Dallas, TX

 

Cistercian Preparatory School was founded in 1962 as a Roman Catholic school. Many of the courses at the middle school level cover subjects usually taught at the high school level. The upper school curriculum keeps students on the educational track.

 

Regis High School; New York

 

This private Jesuit university-preparatory school was founded in 1914. The Regis High School program is based on a basic liberal arts curriculum. Students choose a language to study to help them have a multi-faceted education. All of the courses offered at Regis are extensive and accelerated.

 

Saint Louis Priory School; St. Louis, Missouri

 

This Roman Catholic secondary day school was founded in 1955. Students are offered over a dozen advanced placement courses, all shaped by the Benedictine order’s tradition of Christian humanism. The St. Louis Priory School focuses on Roman Catholic theology.

 

Delbarton School; Morristown, NJ

 

The Delbarton School is an all-male private Roman Catholic college preparatory school. Founded in 1939, this private school offers 24 Advanced Placement courses. This school is a host site for the NJ Seeds’ young scholar’s program. This program allows academically qualified, yet economically disadvantaged students to attend class on the campus.

 

Loyola High School; Los Angeles, CA

 

The Loyola High School of Los Angeles was founded in 1865. For over a century, the Jesuit preparatory school has been preparing students to enter the working world. This school takes students from over 200 zip codes in the LA area. It has a large focus on service projects and is also known for its athletics success.

 

Woodlands Academy of the Sacred Heart; Lake Forest, Illinois

 

Founded in 1858, Woodlands Academy of the Sacred Heart is a school exclusively for young women. Its curriculum is flexible and does not confine the students to a certain level for many courses. This strong academic program provides the best education for young women.

The Fall Semester – Student Nutrition and Scholarly Performance

By the time late September rolls around many parents are frustrated that an elementary school child is not eating well at school. Many have already succumbed to that ever-tempting “lunchables” and a bag of chips. Never forget that a child’s meal is a building block to their health and academic success in school.

Here are a few tips to packing a nutritious lunch that kids love;

  1. If you are packing a sandwich, use whole grain bread. The bread must have 3 or more grams of pure fiber to be“true” whole grain bread.
  2. Package the lunch to look like the popular off the shelf items like “lunchables.” Cut sandwiches into fun shapes like hearts and flowers.
  3. If your scholar won’t eat a sandwich try nutrient dense muffins. You take any basic muffin recipe, use gluten free flour and coconut sugar. Add veggies like Carrots etc.
  4. Be sure to include fruit like grapes, apples and bananas.
  5. Make a trail mix – nut free of course – but you can include things like raisins, dried apples, berries and you can even add some dark organic chocolate chips.
  6. Ditch the Juice and replace with water. Add some food coloring if you need to make a more desirable presentation.

Meals rich in fiber are proven to satisfy hunger which will allow young scholars to focus better on school work. Whole foods for scholars will instill overall well-being and lifelong healthy eating habits. Most importantly, practice what you preach. If your children see you eating well, they too will grow up eating well.

How to Develop Empathy in Children

Empathy isn’t always taught in schools, but in a lot of ways, it’s one of the most valuable lessons that a child can learn. Learning empathy helps a child show compassion for others, understand that everyone has a unique perspective, keep judgmental thoughts to a minimum, and grow into a healthy, compassionate adult that others can look up to. As with anything else, it’s best to start teaching empathy as early as possible. Here’s a few ways that parents can instill a sense of empathy in their children.

1. Teach Children About Their Emotions

One of the best ways to teach children to be empathetic is to help them understand their emotions, so they can later recognize those same emotions in others. Parents can talk to their kids about feelings, help them recognize and identify their different emotions, and limit their screen time as much as possible. Spending hours in front of a screen instead of interacting with real people can stunt their empathy later in life.

2. Help Children Understand Perspective

It can be difficult for children to understand that everyone has a unique perspective. But if a parent starts teaching them as early as possible, it’ll be easier for them to grasp the concept later in life. Their parent can illustrate the concept by saying “How would you feel if someone did that to you?” when the child misbehaves. They can also relate the child’s experiences to others to help them understand what another person might be feeling. Parents should teach their children to “walk in the other person’s shoes” so they understand that everyone has a unique perspective on life, and shouldn’t be judged or condemned for seeing the world differently.

3. Teach Children the Importance of Morals

Instilling their children with a strong sense of right and wrong is one of the best ways to ensure their children will be healthy, compassionate adults. When a child understands that an injustice has taken place, they’ll feel compelled to help and do whatever it takes to make a change. Parents can teach their children about compassion in small ways by encouraging them to show manners, signing them up for volunteer activities, teaching them about the importance of friendship, and more.

Steve Virgadamo

Essential Factors for Effective School Leadership

Leadership is essential to the success of any school. Without proper leadership, there would be no one to plan out the route or direction that the school should be heading in, and there would be no one to guide the district down that path. Not everyone has the ability to be a leader, however, especially for a school. In order to lead a school effectively, there are certain factors people need to aspire toward achieving. Here are some of those factors.

 

Organizational Knowledge

 

The first step to effective leadership is having extensive knowledge of the instructional environment. You need to know what a student will need, the strengths and weaknesses of your fellow staff members, the different instructional programs available in the program, student data, and scheduling. 

 

Effective school leaders take all of this knowledge and turn it into the foundation that the school will be built upon, then move onto approaching the specifics of how the school will be run: how will they address their students’ needs? Who will all be part of the leadership teams necessary for running instructional programs? What programs, exactly, will be taught, and how will this help develop the education students are receiving?

 

Scheduling

 

To achieve a high level of performance, effective leaders will need to be able to schedule their schools for success. This can mainly be observed in what a student’s typical day will look like: when they’ll attend classes, how long the classes will last, how struggling students will be supported during the day, etc. Finalizing details like this will help maximize the number of available support staff at the school while making sure that there are no restraints on necessary resources—this is particularly crucial if the school district is struggling monetarily. 

 

Outside of the school day, scheduling data meetings should be a high priority for school leaders. These meetings will impact how instruction is taught at the school, so it’s important for leadership to allocate time and resources where necessary (one example being hiring substitute teachers). 

 

There are, of course, many other factors that contribute to effective school leadership: using data collected and making decisions based on the facts, having high expectations and positive beliefs that reflect on the culture of the school, and much more. Though aiming for these factors will contribute to a successfully run school, no one expects one person to have all of the answers. It’s a matter of asking the right questions, turning to others for help, sharing a sense of ownership in the problem, and sharing a sense of ownership in the solution that makes someone the best leader that they can be.

 

How to Help Your Children Learn During the Pandemic

While children get ready to go back to school, as a parent it’s natural to worry about what this year’s education will look like in the face of the global pandemic. Some schools are returning to in-person classes that are modified to fit within set guidelines, while some offer a hybrid of in-person and online courses, and others are continuing to teach their students completely remotely. No matter what your children’s school is doing for the upcoming year, there are ways you can help keep their education on trackespecially if they’re remaining remote for this upcoming year. Here are a few of those ways.

 

Establish a routine.

 

Having a routine to follow is important for children and young people, so doing your best to establish one that works within your schedule will be helpful to their education. Try to factor in educational programs that can be followed online, on the television, or on the radio, and set aside some time for reading and, if your children are younger, playtime. When you go about everyday errands and activities, use those moments and turn them into learning opportunities. Important as a routine is, don’t be afraid to switch up the sorts of activities you and your children do together. This will lend them some flexibility in their lives and keep them from becoming restless and agitated. If possible, plan as much as you can with the input from your children being kept in mind.

 

Have an open dialogue.

 

Even if your children are going back to in-person classes, how they receive their education will be much different than how the school year started last fall. Encourage them to ask questions and express their feelings to you, and whatever you do, don’t minimize their concerns. Being in the middle of a pandemic is stressful and scary, and it’s perfectly natural for children to feel these while the world changes around them. Assure them that their feelings about what’s going on are valid and natural, and show them that you’re listening by giving them your full, undivided attention. 

 

Take your time.

 

If your children’s school is fully remote this year, chances are you’ll be playing the role of parent and teacher in some cases. After all, a teacher can only do so much over a Zoom call. If you decide to take some of their learning into your own hands, start out with short, ten minute lessons and work your way up to longer lesson times. Get in contact with your children’s teachers or school if you need any guidance; you can also reach out to parent groups for support if need be.

 

Enrollment Management – A New Normal or Not?

A number of schools are saying they have enrollment concerns for 2020-2021 and others are closing prematurely before seeing what the Fall enrollment will be.  Steve Virgadamo believes that massive school closings may not all be related to pandemic issues. He believes there are steps you can take, even in the “Normal Next Covid” economy, to ensure that your school not only survives but flourishes. The trend of moving students back into government-sponsored schools predates the Covid19 pandemic, with affluent families leading the migration to public schools.

 Bursari Executive Vice President Steve Virgadamo shares with us some thoughts on leadership and Enrollment Marketing.  

Steve says it is not just the pandemic…..

 

  1.     “Own your Brand”
  • Your brand is the essence of who you are. It is a promise to your families and the delivery of that promise is essential to increasing market share. Your brand is unique to you. Your attributes, offerings and whom you serve need to be expressed but they need to be defined and used constantly in all school communication whether printed, digital, or verbal.

 

  1.     “Cater to the Millennial Market”
    • Start by defining the millennial parent – your customer – and identify what millennials are seeking in an education for their child(ren);
    • Identify what unique experiences, resources, and tools you have available that can be used to meet the millennial parents’ expectations;
    • Remember today’s parents are not comparing the customer experience with other schools. They are comparing the speed and comprehensiveness of your customer service to the customer care they experience in every other aspect of their life. Think Amazon and Disney experiences.

       
  1.     “On-Line Marketing Rules the Day”
    • Digital marketing is vital. TV, radio, direct mail, lawn signs etc. are past their “sell by date.” The digital marketing space is expanding every hour. Social media ads should be a primary component of your marketing strategy. They are force multipliers that allow you to broaden your reach while engaging your existing audience in meaningful ways.
    • Digital storytelling is a creative way to familiarize people with your brand. You can show one digital advertisement after another in a specific sequence to tell your story.
    • Hypertargeting is the ability to deliver a tailored message to a specific niche audience. Hypertargeting is the most efficient way to both use and stretch your marketing budget.

 

  1.     “Measure and Assess”

Most schools fail to track and assess the effectiveness of their marketing plan. It is important to remember that you cannot improve what you do not measure.

      • Keep a simple log of all aspects of the enrollment process. Record data such as website visits, information requests, campus tours, applications, deposits, etc.
      • Monitor and track student attrition

         
  1.     “Keep Your Finger on the Market’s Pulse”
    • A benefit of telling your school’s story across digital platforms is that you can watch in real time as your constituents and prospective parents/students interact with your story. Their behavior will let you know what is speaking to them and what is not.
    • Test, adapt and refine your marketing story. Your story shapes your brand. Your brand increases student inquiries and customer service converts inquiries to enrolled students.

 

We would love to hear more about your enrollment management best practices. Email them to Steve Virgadamo – svirgadamo@msn.com.  We are all in this together.

Hope Springs Eternal

In a huge win for Catholic schools, the Supreme Court sided with 3 Montana families who asked the court to declare that excluding religious schools from student aid programs is unconstitutional. The Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue looked at whether the Montana Supreme Court violated the U.S. Constitution when it struck down a tax credit scholarship program that allowed students to attend private schools, including religious schools. The decision in this case could have major implications for the use of public dollars to help parents choose a school for their child to attend.

 

In a joint statement, Archbishop Thomas Wenski, Chair of the Bishops’ Conference committee on Religious Liberty and Bishop Michael Barber, Chair of the Bishops’ Education committee said:

 

“The Supreme Court has dealt a blow to the odious legacy of anti- Catholicism in America. Blaine Amendments which are in 37 states’ constitutions were the product of nativism and bigotry. They were never meant to ensure government neutrality towards religion but were expressions of hostility towards the Catholic Church. We are grateful that the Supreme Court has taken an important step that will end this shameful legacy.”

 

Secretary of Education Betsy Devos said: “This decision represents a potential “turning point” in the sad and static history of American education and called on state legislators to “seize” the extraordinary opportunity to expand education choice options. The bigoted Blaine amendments and other restrictions like them are unconstitutional and have blatantly discriminated against students and families based on faith and have forced parents to enroll children in schools which do not match their values.”

 

Proponents of school choice said it was a major triumph in the courts,” Steve Virgadamo, formerly a Director with the University of Notre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education and currently Executive Vice President of Bursari.com said: “School Choice is a civil rights issue and the weight that this decision carries is immense. It is a victory for student achievement, parental control, and educational opportunities for the poor and marginalized.”

 

Attorney General William Barr said: “That because of the SCOTUS ruling in the Espinoza Case, a state may no longer disqualify religious schools from scholarships or other programs solely because they are religious.”

 

The loss of Catholic schools would be an American tragedy. It would set back opportunities for generations of low income and inner-city neighborhoods. We cannot accept this for America’s children.  The presence of diverse educational options in our country – a thriving government-sponsored school system and a strong network of independent schools, including religious schools – has always been a source of American vitality.  The Supreme Court decision is indeed monumental, and in the 2020-2021 Covid world, there is still much more to be done to protect the educational opportunities for parents, but Hope Springs Eternal.

Why Parents Choose a Catholic Education for Their Children

Choosing a school for your children to go to is an incredibly important decision for a parent to make. You want to select the best possible education for them, but where should you look? Although you could look to your area’s public schools or one of the many private schools that exist, one thing you shouldn’t discount is sending your children to Catholic school. 

 

Why choose Catholic school over the other options? Here are a few reasons to consider

 

Role Models

 

The teachers at Catholic schools often serve as moral role models for their students. These are the people who will be spending hours at a time with your children, so it’s understandable to want teachers who share the same values that your family does. These values often start being taught while the kids are still at home, so choosing a Catholic school for education will mirror the beliefs taught at home and act as an extension of those previous lessons and ideals.

 

Exposure

 

Obviously, sending your children to a Catholic school will create daily exposure of the Catholic faith to them. This will build a strong religious foundation for your kids as lessons on the Catholic faith are taught every day. By the time they graduate, your children will be more likely to continue being involved in the Church than not. Likewise, they’ll be more likely to pray, donate to the Church, and have an identity solidly in Catholicism. 

 

Community

 

Being involved in the Church creates a sense of community, and this extends to Catholic schools. Being involved in a Catholic school creates an easier time for children to develop that sense of community with their peers and fellow parishioners. The Church offers fellowship, friendship, and service opportunities for those who are interested. For kids far from their families to attend school, the Church and their school can become a central hub for their community and involvement.

 

Education

 

A Catholic school is a high-quality and relatively affordable educational opportunity for kids. Private school is notoriously expensive, but many Catholic schools and dioceses have tuition assistance programs for those who need financial aid. These schools are well worth the cost, as graduates from Catholic schools are more likely to go to college and consistently outperform public and other private schools on national and standardized tests.

Summertime, Children and Reading

By Steven Virgadamo, Bursari.com Executive Vice President

 

The current school year is winding down quickly. I get most excited about summertime as it is a good time to establish an amazing connection….summertime, children and reading should be like peas and carrots….things that go well together. Reading for young scholars can always open up galaxies of possibilities, but, reading in those lazy days of summer invites play, the unexpected and encourages an unbridled imagination. Every book is a possibility.

 

Ensuring free time to read and imagine is perhaps the best of summertime opportunities: a wonderful companion to any program, camp or class.

 

But not all great summertime reading should be done by a child in isolation. Sometimes there is nothing better than reading together. Sharing a story with your child means sharing language, life, and perspective. Characters’ decisions, good ones and bad, morph into complex conversations outside the pages. Funny moments become inside jokes, and travels to exotic lands an inexpensive possibility.

 

I wish you all parents and young scholars a summer filled with opportunities to make family memories as well as lots and lots of books.

Top Catholic Podcasts 2020

Podcasts are an excellent way not only to be entertained, but keep informed about various subjects. With topics ranging from broad to niche, it’s no surprise that some Catholics have taken to this medium to spread the word of God to people everywhere. Though there are plenty of podcasts out there that deserve a light shining on them, these particular podcasts have something special about them that makes them the top Catholic podcasts of 2020.

 

The Catholic Feminist

 

This podcast is a call to women everywhere who wish to be “informed, inspired, and intentional” in their faith and community. The host of the show, Claire Swinarski, releases a new episode once a week covering significant topics in today’s world, such as racism, postpartum depression, human trafficking, immigration, and much more. Swinarski remains authentic in her episodes and has genuine discussions about the role of women in both the Church and in society, creating a space for those who wish to feel empowered.

 

Jen Said What?!

 

Jen Fulwiler, host of the SiriusXM radio show The Jennifer Fulwiler Show, takes points of interest from her radio job and highlights them during her podcast. A former atheist and nerd mother to six children, Fulwiler examines pop culture engagingly and thoughtfully that’s sure to be entertaining. Her podcast is perfect for those who want to listen to her radio show, but are never quite able to catch it.

 

Word on Fire

 

The Word on Fire podcast, hosted by Bishop Barron, skillfully takes the richness of Catholicism and interweaves it with modern culture. His podcast is both vivid and accessible to Catholics at all stages of their journey with Christ, educating and uplifting his audience to the truth and knowledge found within the Church. From insights on great Catholic thinkers to everyday, practical advice, Bishop Barron’s Word on Fire is a must-listen.

 

Fr. Mike Schmitz

 

Fans of Fr. Mike Schmitz’s YouTube channel will be thrilled to learn that he also has a podcast available to listen to while on the go. Though short, Fr. Mike Schmitz often reflects on a variety of topics, such as practical living advice and Catholic teachings. His podcast is down-to-earth and aims to “help listeners live out the Christian life more effectively.”