Tag: Catholicism

Hope Springs Eternal

In a huge win for Catholic schools, the Supreme Court sided with 3 Montana families who asked the court to declare that excluding religious schools from student aid programs is unconstitutional. The Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue looked at whether the Montana Supreme Court violated the U.S. Constitution when it struck down a tax credit scholarship program that allowed students to attend private schools, including religious schools. The decision in this case could have major implications for the use of public dollars to help parents choose a school for their child to attend.

 

In a joint statement, Archbishop Thomas Wenski, Chair of the Bishops’ Conference committee on Religious Liberty and Bishop Michael Barber, Chair of the Bishops’ Education committee said:

 

“The Supreme Court has dealt a blow to the odious legacy of anti- Catholicism in America. Blaine Amendments which are in 37 states’ constitutions were the product of nativism and bigotry. They were never meant to ensure government neutrality towards religion but were expressions of hostility towards the Catholic Church. We are grateful that the Supreme Court has taken an important step that will end this shameful legacy.”

 

Secretary of Education Betsy Devos said: “This decision represents a potential “turning point” in the sad and static history of American education and called on state legislators to “seize” the extraordinary opportunity to expand education choice options. The bigoted Blaine amendments and other restrictions like them are unconstitutional and have blatantly discriminated against students and families based on faith and have forced parents to enroll children in schools which do not match their values.”

 

Proponents of school choice said it was a major triumph in the courts,” Steve Virgadamo, formerly a Director with the University of Notre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education and currently Executive Vice President of Bursari.com said: “School Choice is a civil rights issue and the weight that this decision carries is immense. It is a victory for student achievement, parental control, and educational opportunities for the poor and marginalized.”

 

Attorney General William Barr said: “That because of the SCOTUS ruling in the Espinoza Case, a state may no longer disqualify religious schools from scholarships or other programs solely because they are religious.”

 

The loss of Catholic schools would be an American tragedy. It would set back opportunities for generations of low income and inner-city neighborhoods. We cannot accept this for America’s children.  The presence of diverse educational options in our country – a thriving government-sponsored school system and a strong network of independent schools, including religious schools – has always been a source of American vitality.  The Supreme Court decision is indeed monumental, and in the 2020-2021 Covid world, there is still much more to be done to protect the educational opportunities for parents, but Hope Springs Eternal.

Why Parents Choose a Catholic Education for Their Children

Choosing a school for your children to go to is an incredibly important decision for a parent to make. You want to select the best possible education for them, but where should you look? Although you could look to your area’s public schools or one of the many private schools that exist, one thing you shouldn’t discount is sending your children to Catholic school. 

 

Why choose Catholic school over the other options? Here are a few reasons to consider

 

Role Models

 

The teachers at Catholic schools often serve as moral role models for their students. These are the people who will be spending hours at a time with your children, so it’s understandable to want teachers who share the same values that your family does. These values often start being taught while the kids are still at home, so choosing a Catholic school for education will mirror the beliefs taught at home and act as an extension of those previous lessons and ideals.

 

Exposure

 

Obviously, sending your children to a Catholic school will create daily exposure of the Catholic faith to them. This will build a strong religious foundation for your kids as lessons on the Catholic faith are taught every day. By the time they graduate, your children will be more likely to continue being involved in the Church than not. Likewise, they’ll be more likely to pray, donate to the Church, and have an identity solidly in Catholicism. 

 

Community

 

Being involved in the Church creates a sense of community, and this extends to Catholic schools. Being involved in a Catholic school creates an easier time for children to develop that sense of community with their peers and fellow parishioners. The Church offers fellowship, friendship, and service opportunities for those who are interested. For kids far from their families to attend school, the Church and their school can become a central hub for their community and involvement.

 

Education

 

A Catholic school is a high-quality and relatively affordable educational opportunity for kids. Private school is notoriously expensive, but many Catholic schools and dioceses have tuition assistance programs for those who need financial aid. These schools are well worth the cost, as graduates from Catholic schools are more likely to go to college and consistently outperform public and other private schools on national and standardized tests.

Top Catholic Podcasts 2020

Podcasts are an excellent way not only to be entertained, but keep informed about various subjects. With topics ranging from broad to niche, it’s no surprise that some Catholics have taken to this medium to spread the word of God to people everywhere. Though there are plenty of podcasts out there that deserve a light shining on them, these particular podcasts have something special about them that makes them the top Catholic podcasts of 2020.

 

The Catholic Feminist

 

This podcast is a call to women everywhere who wish to be “informed, inspired, and intentional” in their faith and community. The host of the show, Claire Swinarski, releases a new episode once a week covering significant topics in today’s world, such as racism, postpartum depression, human trafficking, immigration, and much more. Swinarski remains authentic in her episodes and has genuine discussions about the role of women in both the Church and in society, creating a space for those who wish to feel empowered.

 

Jen Said What?!

 

Jen Fulwiler, host of the SiriusXM radio show The Jennifer Fulwiler Show, takes points of interest from her radio job and highlights them during her podcast. A former atheist and nerd mother to six children, Fulwiler examines pop culture engagingly and thoughtfully that’s sure to be entertaining. Her podcast is perfect for those who want to listen to her radio show, but are never quite able to catch it.

 

Word on Fire

 

The Word on Fire podcast, hosted by Bishop Barron, skillfully takes the richness of Catholicism and interweaves it with modern culture. His podcast is both vivid and accessible to Catholics at all stages of their journey with Christ, educating and uplifting his audience to the truth and knowledge found within the Church. From insights on great Catholic thinkers to everyday, practical advice, Bishop Barron’s Word on Fire is a must-listen.

 

Fr. Mike Schmitz

 

Fans of Fr. Mike Schmitz’s YouTube channel will be thrilled to learn that he also has a podcast available to listen to while on the go. Though short, Fr. Mike Schmitz often reflects on a variety of topics, such as practical living advice and Catholic teachings. His podcast is down-to-earth and aims to “help listeners live out the Christian life more effectively.” 

Virgadamo Named One of the Most Influential People in the Last 25 Years of Catholic Education

Originally posted on Zip06.com

Steven Virgadamo was unanimously chosen by the Board of the National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA) as this year’s recipient of the 2018 Monsignor John Meyers Presidential Award. This award is presented to an individual who has provided substantial support for Catholic education through contributions in the areas of institutional advancement, financial management, and philanthropic support. Such contributions should be recognized as having current significance at the national level.   Previous recipients of the Monsignor Meyers Presidential Award include: Terrance Cardinal Cooke, Joseph Cardinal Bernadin, and Dr. Elinor Ford.

Steven’s professional career has taken him from working with one of the premier consulting firms in the nation, extending his work to forming leaders at the University of Notre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education Program and beyond. He has worked in over 90% of the Catholic dioceses in the United States and has provided counsel to more than 6000 Catholic schools.

In announcing the award, members of the NCEA Board referred to Steve as one of the most influential people in Catholic Education over the past 25 years. When the Archdiocese of New York began its bold and courageous restructuring to a regionalized system of Catholic schools, – “ Build Bold Futures”, they turned to Steven Virgadamo to provide the leadership for forming Catholic School leaders who could effectively take the helm of schools under such an innovative and bold new school governance. Steve is recognized globally for his writing, speaking but most importantly for empowering leaders to embrace visionary change.   

The Catholic Church may be reinventing how Catholic schools are governed and managed, but is through the leadership of Steven Virgadamo that they are re-inventing how Principals and Superintendents are being developed to lead its schools into the next generation.

Catholic School Leadership is a Reflective Practice

Catholic School improvement efforts rely heavily on Leadership. In my 30 plus years of partnering with more than 6000 Catholic schools in 120 Catholic dioceses I can say with certainty that the difference between a good Catholic school and a great one is the school leader.

I encourage all Catholic school leaders and in particular first year school leaders to be reflective, particularly over the Christmas break each year, \as I have learned that a reflective practice is a quality of a school leader. After winning 3 National Champion ships, Knute Rockne said: “There is no reason for me to continue unless I can improve.”

Over the past few days of this Christmas break, I have been reflecting myself, particularly on the qualities of an effective Catholic school leader and believe strongly that the most effective Catholic school leaders – serve first – build trust and always, always bear witness to their values.

Catholic school leaders must be great communicators as it is they who articulate the vision, mission, and profile of the grad at graduation to staff, parents and the larger Catholic community. They need to be focused on building a culture which will have a positive impact on student learning, achievement and Faith formation. The very best Catholic school leaders manage by walking around as they get to know the students by name and can by observation identify areas where teachers can improve. Most importantly, effective Catholic school leaders are filled with a missionary zeal and unwilling to ever give up on a young scholar. The very best Catholic school leaders are the epitome of pastoral and instructional leadership for the students, staff and parents.