School is a fundamental foundation for children as they grow and develop. It’s how they discover the world, learn new things, find their passions, and become their own person. Some parents choose to send their children to the local public school, while others decide to enroll their kids in a private school. Homeschooling is another option for your children’s education, but it’s not for everyone. Playing the role of parent and teacher is a large responsibility that will affect both your child and your family. Before deciding to homeschool, it’s best to know the pros and cons to determine whether this mode of education is right for you.

 

Family Time

 

One of the more obvious results of homeschooling is the increased amount of family time. As both parent and teacher, you’ll be spending a lot of time with your children, which can ultimately lay a foundation for a stronger relationship between you. As your child’s teacher, you’ll have a direct role in what they learn, how they learn it, and making sure it aligns with your own moral values. However, taking on both roles in your child’s life will carve a good chunk out of your personal free-time, as you’ll need to plan lessons and handle administrative work in addition to parental responsibilities. This can lead to stress and fatigue in the long run.

 

Socialization

 

Being homeschooled can limit the number of people your children know that are their own age. This can seem preferable to some—by being homeschooled, there’s a smaller chance of your children being bullied or ridiculed by others, which in turn can help prevent low self-esteem and encourage learning. Homeschooled children also have more interactions with adults and other homeschooled children of varying ages and skill levels. However, since this method of learning limits the number of people your kids will know that are their own age, it can result in a smaller friend group overall. 

 

Education

 

Unlike with public schools, homeschooling will provide the chance for your kids to move quickly through topics that come easy to them and focus on more challenging lessons or on topics that catch their attention as opposed to ones outside of their interest. You’ll also be able to personalize your teaching style to benefit the way your children learn the best rather than enforcing a standard way of teaching that many kids will need to adapt to. Perhaps the best part for kids is the lack of homework necessary. Since they’re learning at home already, there’s no need for extra work to be done outside of school hours unless they’re struggling with something in particular. 

 

On the flip side, you likely won’t have as many readily available resources at your disposal as public and private schools do, and you’ll have to be the sole teacher of a broad range of topics as opposed to being specialized in one field. That, in addition to less time to dedicate toward parenting and the possibility of less structure than a public or private school, can affect your child’s overall education and learning.